Pathology Presents: Illuminating the Microenvironments that Shape the Immune Response

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Speaker

Michael Gerner, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Immunology
University of Washington

Faculty Sponsor

Kelly Smith, MD, PhD


Date & Time

January 20, 2016 at 4:30pm - 5:30pm

Location

Health Sciences Building, T-739

Calendar

Pathology Presents

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Add to Calendar 01/20/2016 04:30 PM 01/20/2016 05:30 PM America/Los_Angeles Pathology Presents: Illuminating the Microenvironments that Shape the Immune Response Pathology Presents: Illuminating the Microenvironments that Shape the Immune Response

Michael Gerner, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Immunology
University of Washington
Why Attend? Illuminating the Microenvironments that Shape the Immune Response The immune system is composed of a multitude of functionally unique innate and adaptive cell types that work together to protect against diverse perturbations and challenges. Further, these cells appear to reside in unique micro-anatomical regions in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, suggesting that cellular spatial organization is critical for normal homeostasis and immunity. In particular, the laboratory focuses on understanding how dendritic cell positioning in lymphoid organs influences the capture of vaccine and pathogen derived antigens, as well as the downstream interactions with T cells. To investigate such questions directly in vivo, we are utilizing various cutting-edge imaging approaches, such as multi-parameter quantitative Histo-Cytometry, intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, as well as are developing novel techniques for whole-organ imaging. Collectively, the work provides insights into structure-function relationships for tissues and their immune cell constituents, as well as paves way for improving rational vaccine design.
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Description

Why Attend?

Illuminating the Microenvironments that Shape the Immune Response

The immune system is composed of a multitude of functionally unique innate and adaptive cell types that work together to protect against diverse perturbations and challenges. Further, these cells appear to reside in unique micro-anatomical regions in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, suggesting that cellular spatial organization is critical for normal homeostasis and immunity. In particular, the laboratory focuses on understanding how dendritic cell positioning in lymphoid organs influences the capture of vaccine and pathogen derived antigens, as well as the downstream interactions with T cells. To investigate such questions directly in vivo, we are utilizing various cutting-edge imaging approaches, such as multi-parameter quantitative Histo-Cytometry, intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, as well as are developing novel techniques for whole-organ imaging. Collectively, the work provides insights into structure-function relationships for tissues and their immune cell constituents, as well as paves way for improving rational vaccine design.