Pathology Presents: Disease Modeling and Heart Regeneration with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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Speaker

Charles Murry, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Pathology
University of Washington

Faculty Sponsor

Peter Rabinovitch, MD, PhD


Date & Time

June 15, 2016 at 4:30pm - 5:30pm

Location

Health Sciences Building, T-739

Calendar

Pathology Presents

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Add to Calendar 06/15/2016 04:30 PM 06/15/2016 05:30 PM America/Los_Angeles Pathology Presents: Disease Modeling and Heart Regeneration with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Pathology Presents: Disease Modeling and Heart Regeneration with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

Charles Murry, MD, PhD
Professor, Department of Pathology
University of Washington
Why Attend? Disease Modeling and Heart Regeneration with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Heart disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence in the US is increasing as our population ages. Our group uses pluripotent stem cells to derive human cardiomyocytes that can be used for disease modeling, tissue engineering, drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this lecture I will describe progress in modeling the most common genetic cause of heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy, using both patient-derived stem cells and genome editing, and describe strategies to enhance cardiomyocyte maturation for the study of adult-onset disease. In the second half, I will review our progress in regenerating the heart with human cardiomyocytes, detailing our recent efforts in nonhuman primates and plans for a clinical trial.
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Description

Why Attend?

Disease Modeling and Heart Regeneration with Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

Heart disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence in the US is increasing as our population ages. Our group uses pluripotent stem cells to derive human cardiomyocytes that can be used for disease modeling, tissue engineering, drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this lecture I will describe progress in modeling the most common genetic cause of heart failure, dilated cardiomyopathy, using both patient-derived stem cells and genome editing, and describe strategies to enhance cardiomyocyte maturation for the study of adult-onset disease. In the second half, I will review our progress in regenerating the heart with human cardiomyocytes, detailing our recent efforts in nonhuman primates and plans for a clinical trial.