Martin Darvas, PhD

Acting Assistant Professor

Martin Darvas, PhD

E-mail:

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Office Location:

HMC R&T - Room 703A

Mailing Address:

Box 359645
325 Ninth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104


Clinical and Research Background

Dr. Darvas received his education at the University of Bonn (Diploma and PhD in Biology). His postgraduate training was at the University of Washington (Department of Biochemistry). Currently, Dr. Darvas is Acting Assistant Professor at the Department of Pathology at the University of Washington.

The focus of Dr. Darvas’ research is on identifying brain circuits and neurotransmitter systems that are relevant for basic mechanisms of learning, memory and decision making, and for cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease. Our goal is to define key neurotransmitter systems and brain areas and thereby identify new potential therapeutic targets. In addition, we investigate the interaction between neurotransmitter systems that are affected in Parkinson’s disease and thereby create more disease models that more accurately reflect the complexity of neurodegenerative disease. The Darvas Laboratory addresses these prevalent, urgent questions through experimental studies that utilize a combination of mouse genetics, viral gene transfer, behavioral, pharmacological, biochemical and histological techniques. Furthermore, we test hypotheses concerning specific mechanisms of neuron injury and how these are relevant for pathological processes in Parkinson’s disease.

Academic and Medical Appointments

Acting Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2013-Present

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Fellow, Biochemistry Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2008-2013

University of Bonn, Department of Molecular Psychiatry, Bonn, Germany, Ph.D., 2007

University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany, Diploma, 2003

Publications

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